Can I Give My Dog Children’s Tylenol?

Dogs are like family members, and we want to do whatever we can to make sure they stay healthy and happy. But sometimes, our dogs get sick or hurt and we don’t know what to do. One of the most common questions pet owners have is whether or not they can give their dog children’s Tylenol. In this blog post, we will answer that question for you and provide some other information about Tylenol for dogs.

Can I Give My Dog Children’s Tylenol?

It can be tempting to reach for the children’s Tylenol when your dog is in pain, but it is important to know that this medication is not regulated when it comes to dogs. There is no approved veterinary use since each dog has different pain thresholds and metabolizes medication differently.

That said, some veterinarians may recommend giving your dog a very small dose of children’s Tylenol for pain relief, but it is always best to check with your vet first.

Your vet may allow your dog to have somewhere between 5 to 10 milligrams of children’s Tylenol for each pound of weight. They may recommend you administer this dose every 12 hours.

Potential Side Effects of Children’s Tylenol

Dogs are likely to have different side effects when it comes to human pain medicine. Here are some of the common side effects that have been reported in dogs after taking Tylenol:

Gastrointestinal Upset

Tylenol can be tough on your pup’s stomach. This can lead to inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, and can also manifest as stomach ulcers, which happens when the stomach’s lining gets eroded.

Liver Damage

One of the most serious potential side effects of giving your dog Tylenol is liver damage. The liver is responsible for metabolizing drugs in the body, and when it can’t do its job properly, it can lead to a build-up of toxins in the blood. This can cause liver failure, which can be fatal.

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Kidney Damage

Tylenol can also cause kidney damage in dogs. The kidneys are responsible for filtering toxins from the blood, and when they’re not working properly, it can lead to a build-up of toxins in the body. This can cause kidney failure, which can be fatal.

Death

While it is rare, it is possible for dogs to die after taking Tylenol. This will happen if a dog has gotten access to a very large amount of medication, or if it has underlying health conditions that make it more susceptible to the side effects of Tylenol.

As you can see, there are a number of potential side effects that could be harmful to your dog. That is why it is always best to check with your veterinarian before giving your dog any medication.

What to Do if My Dog Eats Children’s Tylenol?

You may be wondering what to do if your dog gets ahold of Children’s Tylenol when you haven’t administered it yourself.

The most important thing to do is estimate the amount of Tylenol that your pup has ingested. Was it an entire bottle? Just a few pills? A little bit of liquid? This will help you and your veterinarian determine how to best treat your dog.

If you think your dog has ingested a large amount of Tylenol, it is important to seek veterinary care immediately. Tylenol toxicity can be fatal if not treated quickly.

It can take anywhere between 1 to 4 hours for signs of Tylenol toxicity to appear in dogs, depending on how much they have ingested, and how quickly they metabolize the drug.

Next, you will need to keep a very close eye on your dog and provide them with plenty of water to help flush the Tylenol out of their system.

Some other symptoms to look out for include:

Lethargy

Your dog may seem very tired and slow after taking Tylenol. This may be a sign that the medication is starting to build up in their system and is causing liver damage, or that your pup is feeling uncomfortable and bloated from the effects of the medication.

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Loss of Appetite

If your dog is not interested in food, it may be a sign that something is wrong. This could be due to the pain medication making them feel nauseous, or it could be a sign of liver or kidney damage.

Yellowing of the Eyes or Skin

This is another symptom of liver damage and should be treated as an emergency. This condition is known as jaundice, and it happens when the body can’t properly metabolize bilirubin.

Vomiting

Vomiting is a common side effect of Tylenol in dogs. It may be a sign that your dog’s stomach is upset and it needs to reject the medication. While this can be problematic, it’s a good sign if your dog’s body is trying to reject Tylenol. Make sure to keep your dog hydrated and if the vomiting continues, take them to get treated. Don’t try to induce vomiting in your pup on your own. 

Diarrhea

This is another common side effect of Tylenol in dogs. This means that the medicine has caused the body to quickly flush it out, which can lead to dehydration if not treated properly.

Whimpering or Crying

This could be a sign of pain, specifically abdominal pain in your pup. Make sure to keep an eye on any other signs of discomfort such as a distended stomach or a hunched-over posture.

Panting

Panting as well as an increased heart rate are signs of pain and discomfort in dogs. You should also keep an eye out for excessive drooling. Because Tylenol makes it challenging for your dog’s red blood cells to carry oxygen, they may need to breathe more rapidly to get enough airflow.

What Can I Give My Dog for Pain?

There are a number of different pain treatments that are safe for dogs, but it is always best to check with your veterinarian before giving your dog any medication.

In general, it’s best to avoid all over-the-counter medications meant for humans unless you’ve been expressly told by your veterinarian that it is safe to do so. This means you should avoid Ibuprofen, acetaminophen, aspirin, and naproxen.

Here are some safer options for pain relief in dogs, when under the supervision of a vet:

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Carprofen

This is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly used to treat pain and inflammation in dogs. It works by inhibiting the production of prostaglandins, which are hormones that play a role in pain and inflammation.

Meloxicam

This is another NSAID that is commonly used to treat pain and inflammation in dogs. It works by inhibiting the production of prostaglandins, which are hormones that play a role in pain and inflammation.

Gabapentin

This medication is typically used to treat seizures in dogs, but it can also be effective for pain relief. It works by blocking nerve signals that are sent to the brain.

Acepromazine

This medication is typically used as a sedative, but it can also be effective for pain relief. It works by blocking nerve signals that are sent to the brain.

Tramadol

This is a synthetic opioid that is commonly used to treat pain in dogs. It works by binding to the opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, which reduces the perception of pain.

Natural Pain Relief Options for Your Pup

There are also a number of natural pain relief options that you can try for your pup.

CBD Oil

CBD oil is derived from the cannabis plant, but it does not contain THC, the psychoactive component of marijuana. CBD oil has been shown to be effective for pain relief in humans and dogs. It works by interacting with the body’s endocannabinoid system, which plays a role in pain and inflammation.

Turmeric

This is a spice that contains curcumin, a compound with anti-inflammatory properties. You can give your dog turmeric powder mixed with their food or you can purchase treats that contain turmeric.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Omega-Three fatty acids are a type of fat that has anti-inflammatory properties. They can be found in fish oil supplements or you can give your dog fresh fish such as salmon or tuna.